Visuospatial Neglect Tests


Visuospatial Neglect Tests

This battery consists of various tests, partly classic tests and partly new tests, which have been developed as part of a PhD project by Nathalie Vaes at Ghent University and RevArte Rehabilitation Centre. The following tests are part of the battery:

  • Maze Visuospatial Navigation test. The task has a central starting point at the bottom and a free end point at the top. The instruction is to find one’s way to the top via the shortest route.
  • The Bells test: a classic way of demonstrating neglect.
  • Diamond cancellation, in which one has to find and cancel the diamonds in between many other little line figures.
  • The Schenkenberg line bisection test (Schenkenberg et al., 1980), with a slightly improved alignment of the lines.
  • Colored rectangle bisection
  • Visual search time test. Its 16 items consist of a grid comprising 20 different stimuli, centered around one stimulus identical to one of the other stimuli.
  • Drawing test. Two symmetrical line drawings: an alarm clock and a relatively complex butterfly.
  • Spatial memory test. This test consisted of six left- and six right-located pictural stimuli to remember.
  • Extinction test. A participant needs to stay focused on the central spot of the tablet where the digits 0, 1, and 5 are randomly presented. At the same time, one or two bilateral
    dots are displayed.

The following picture shows Nathalie Vaes and a client performing one of the tests on a 22 inch pen tablet. A short demonstration video is also available on YouTube, as well as a video recorded at RevArte Rehabilitation Centre using a smaller, mobile A4-sized tablet.

Nathalie Vaes Ghent University

Scientific references/publications:

  • Vaes N., Lafosse C., Nys G., Schevernels H., Dereymaeker L., Oostra K., Hemelsoet D., Vingerhoets G. (2015) Capturing peripersonal spatial neglect: an electronic method to quantify visuospatial processes.
  • Vaes N., Lafosse C., Hemelsoet D., Van Tichelt E., Oostra K., Vingerhoets G. (2015) Contraversive Neglect? A Modulation of Visuospatial Neglect in Association With Contraversive Pushing.